Van Jones Statement on Tulsa Officer’s Indictment

Dream Corps Stands in Solidarity with the Black Community

“Yesterday’s indictment of the Betty Shelby, the police officer who killed Terence Crutcher, is an important step towards healing and justice.  

No human being should play the roles of judge, jury, and executioner in one moment.

The violence against black communities in the last week only deepens the pain and frustration African Americans have with our biased criminal justice system.

Good people on both sides of this divide have legitimate fears and frustrations. We cannot let the reservoir of empathy run dry in this country. We must find a way to work together to stop this madness.”


Dream Corps launches Day of Empathy Campaign

The Day of Empathy is a national day of action to generate empathy on a massive scale for millions of Americans impacted by the incarceration industry. 

Virtual reality has been described as an “empathy machine.”  #cut50, a Dream Corps initiative, launched the Day of Empathy campaign to create empathy on a massive scale for the millions of Americans behind bars. In partnership with Benefit Studios, the team will create a series of virtual reality experiences based on true stories  that reveal a broken aspect of our criminal justice system. 

The campaign will recruit Ambassadors of Empathy who will bring virtual reality visors/headsets into all 50 state capitols and the U.S. Congress.Through the impact of VR, key decision-makers will experience the human consequences of a criminal justice system that has gotten too big, too unfair and too brutal.

Visit the campaign page to learn about the Day of Empathy. 


Fast Company: Van Jones And Jamie Wong Use VR To Tell The Story Of The Prison System

Screen_Shot_2016-09-23_at_10.41.54_AM.pngIn an average-sized kindergarten classroom in the U.S., at least one child may have a parent behind bars. But most Americans still struggle to imagine what it's like to have an incarcerated father or mother. A new short film tries to make it clearer: strap on a virtual reality headset, and the film puts you in the place of an eight-year-old girl watching her mom go to prison, and ending up in foster care.

The short, Left Behind, is the first in a series of virtual reality films called Project Empathy. The first films start with the prison system, letting viewers experience re-entry into society, what it's like to be a child tried as an adult, and what it's like to have a family member in prison. 

"Virtual reality is being referred to as the empathy machine, and there's really no bigger empathy gap than the one that exists between people who live in overly policed and overly incarcerated communities and those who do not," says Van Jones, who worked with filmmaker Jamie Wong on the first films. "We just want to do everything that we can to give people more of a felt sense of what it's like to live in a situation where law enforcement is not always friendly, and where the stakes for any mistake are incredibly high."

Read more


Vien Truong White House Champions of Change

ShakaVan_Commonwealth_(2).pngMy work is an extension of my life. I'm the youngest of eleven kids, born to a refugee family that fled war-torn Vietnam. I didn’t initially understand that there was anything abnormal about my upbringing: spending my first few years on my mother’s back as she picked strawberries and snow peas in the pesticide-ridden fields of Oregon, and then later on watching - and eventually helping - as my parents labored away in the sweatshops in West Oakland, one of the poorest and most polluted communities in California.

It wasn’t until I was able to travel and live in other parts of the United States that I began understanding that these conditions were abnormal. I decided to dedicate my life to alleviating poverty and building the beloved communities that Dr. Martin Luther King envisioned.

One of the proudest moments of my life was helping to pass a landmark community reinvestment bill in California that created a polluters pay fund, which has created the largest fund in history for low-income communities to green up and to create economic revitalization for residents. In the last two years, it directed over $900 million into the poorest and most polluted communities in California. Now, I’m privileged to be leading Green For All to create national programs that will prioritize low-income communities and communities of color in the crafting of policy across the country.

Vien Truong leads Green For All, a national initiative that puts communities of color at the forefront of the climate movement and equality at the center of environmental solutions. She lives in East Oakland, California with her husband and twin three-year-old boys.

 


Why I'm a part of the Dream Team

By Roger Leu

ShakaVan_Commonwealth_(1).pngMy family still calls me by my Chinese-given name, roughly translated to “little winter melon.” Though partially attributed to my gratuitous baby fat, the nickname also aptly describes my still and observant nature. I have always found people, culture, and human behavior fascinating. Why do people do the things they do? Why did Tom Cruise jump uncontrollably on The Oprah Show some years ago? Why do people find Keeping up with the Kardashians so compelling? These are the questions that keep me up at night.

I grew up in Berkeley, California, a relatively small town in the San Francisco Bay Area known for tie-dyed shirts, colorful protests, and subversive thinking. My parents are first generation immigrants who emigrated to the United States from Taiwan in search of a better future. My dad first worked as a dishwasher and a gas attendant to pay the bills. My mom briefly worked on a fiber optics assembly line. They are quintessential pragmatists that would rather have me put on five layers of clothing than turn on the heater, unplug the idle power strip rather than pay for electricity, and shop at swap meets instead of department stores.

The look on their faces when I told them I wanted to pursue a career in social work was one of sheer confusion and terror (think Edvard Munch’s The Scream). “Is that like depression?” they asked in an English-Chinese improvisation. I simply responded, “It’s like having a big heart and helping people for a living.”

Social workers are so often misrepresented in pop culture as villains that invade your home and steal your children on behalf of the government. This is a terrific example to not believe everything you see on television! A social worker is the shoulder you lean on when you have a bad day. We are the extra ear that listens when you need to vent. We fight for the most vulnerable individuals in our communities. We are your advocates, your confidants, your strongest supporters, your champions of social justice.  

The #cut50, #YesWeCode, and Green For All initiatives here at The Dream Corps are united under the umbrella of social justice. We continue the fight for a brighter future that includes all communities regardless of race, gender, color, or creed. We are agents of change that support closing prison doors and opening the doors of opportunity.

The #cut50 team has been advocating tirelessly for 2.2 million people remaining behind prison doors. As a social worker and a member of the #cut50 team, I am proud to work toward intelligently reducing the prison population in 10 years, and to engage in a bipartisan effort that rises above politics. Individuals in prison are often suffering from mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder; we must remember to arm ourselves with kindness, compassion, and empathy to combat arguably one of the biggest moral crises in our time.

As I look at the road ahead, I cannot help but think of what the great Dr. Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. once wrote: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” These words are as true today as the day they were written. Indeed, there is still injustice in the world, and we must continue to fight for equality, justice, and the inherent worth of all beings.    

I am inspired by the small acts of kindness I see every day. When I leave the BART station and see a passing stranger hand a homeless man a dollar, I am inspired. When I see a group of friends organizing their waste into trash, recycle, and compost bins, I am hopeful. When I see Buzzfeed articles that combat the stigma of mental illness, I am filled with confidence about the future of humanity.



Donate Get Involved Our Initiatives