Why I'm a Part of Dream Corps

When I was introduced to the concept of environmental racism in college, it helped me understand the importance of including equity when forming environmental policy. I’ve read about how poor, minority neighborhoods in major cities, like Oakland and New York, were decimated under the guise of “urban development”; whole communities were economically devastated by the highways cutting through them to convenience wealthier whites commuting from the suburbs. I’ve read about low-income people being forced to choose between their health and earning a living, such the coal miners in the East and those working in the plastic manufacturing plants in the South. The_latest_photo_(1).png

What can I do? This is a question most people have after learning about the injustices happening in the world. It is a question I have had after seeing and experiencing the obstacles people of color and the poor have in our struggle to live a life with dignity. What can I do to help bring about a more equitable and just society? It turns out that I can make a difference through nonprofit fundraising. As a development associate for Green For All, I support a team dedicated to bringing equity to the forefront of environmental policy, and to making polluters pay for the damage they cause.

I always thought fundraising was just about, well, raising money. I knew it was an essential part to the efficacy of a social justice organization. Programs that serve the public good need funding to make an impact. Whether it’s a program to teach people to code, provide reentry services to the formerly incarcerated, or push politicians to ensure their constituents have clean water and air, they need money to function. It’s not enough to be the change we want to see in the world. We must invest in it.

It was Dream Corps’ Director of External Relations, Nisha Anand, who taught me the power of fundraising as an organizing tool. A tool to strengthen and grow movements. I never thought about it that way before. The idea that people who donate, however much they are able, feel more empowered in their activism inspired me. Donors become investors in the causes they care about and are affected by. But a good investment produces solid returns. Dream Corps is an investment in the just future we hope for.

The Dream Corps has concrete steps to address different social problems that also recognizes how they intersect. Cut50’s plan is to decrease the incarcerated population by 50 percent. Many people affected by mass incarceration are from low-income, minority communities who will need economic and rehabilitative opportunities. Green for All aims to include low-income communities in the nascent green economy and make sure racial and class equity are a priorities in the environmental movement. Yes We Code is preparing young people of color for careers in the tech sector, giving them the skills to create solutions for their communities. Dream Corps brings these different movements together to create a stronger, collaborative front against injustice.

I don’t think this is the only answer to the question what can I do. There are multiple forms of activism and everyone has something they can contribute. Small donations from caring people are as important and impactful as large grants. Volunteering one’s time is also an honorable and valuable contribution to social justice movements. Dream Corps’s mission is just one of many answers that I believe makes sense and will build a foundation for improving society. As a development assistant, I play a role in organizing the movement for an equitable and sustainable future. Empowering communities through fundraising is something I can do.